Where are the 10 best affordable Dental Tourism Destinations?

The need for affordable dentistry has never been greater, and so traveling abroad to get better prices is very much an option. It doesn’t matter who you are today – times are tough, but just where is the best place for dental tourism?

Fortunately, there’s no shortage of options no matter where you choose to go, and dental patients from around the world can save up to 70% just by visiting a dental clinic abroad.

Best places seem to be countries in your own continent, although why this should be so no-one really knows! The main thing is to check out these top dental destinations and see how much you can save!

Mexico

Hop on a plane for treatment in a resort town like Cabo San Lucas, Cancun or Puerto Vallarta. Or, take a short drive across the border for excellent care at a discounted price. Most frequent visitors: Americans, Canadians.

Thailand

Thailand boasts some of the largest and most modern dental hospitals in the entire world. Tens of thousands of dental tourists have been successfully treated by expert dentists in a tropical locale. Most frequent visitors: Australians, Americans, Canadians, New Zealanders.

Spain

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Is your doctor always running late? Does 10:15 become 11:15?

Doctor’s appointments, do you really ever get in @10:15?

I doubt it. Success in seeing your doctor at the scheduled appointment time is like a crap shoot, and typically not my luck. I’m forever on time, I don’t know why she never is and I keep forgetting to bring my camping gear to set up for the day.

You recognize a dilemma when the receptionist slides the plexiglass window and smiles, “Hi Deb, she’s a little backed up this morning, we’ll call you soon”. ‘Backed up a bit, call you soon?’ “Backed up” in my experience translates to at least a minimum of 1 hour or more.

I detest these ‘backed up’ doctors, people are trapped in the waiting room fearful to leave for even a snack or pee break in the event your name is called. I think to myself, “Why did I take all morning off work, run like an idiot for the bus, not grab a coffee or something to read on the way, all so I wouldn’t be late for this appointment. Why do they book every 15 minutes, when they’re never on time?

After you have called everyone you can think of (most are at work or waiting at their doctor’s office), play scrabble or crossword on your phone or delete old contacts and your cell is frantic for a charge…your name is called. Yippeee! Now you are escorted into a smaller waiting room to wait and wait and wait some more!

~~~ Article written & copyrighted © by Deb McCarthy

Narcissistic Parents – the most harmful type of parent

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(I’m reposting this article from last year, as it was edited and updated)

“Deb, we talk about your weight almost every day and you’re still not losing any. You are just not listening to us. Just remember, if you ever want a boyfriend or get married then lose the weight.”    OR

“Deb, I don’t have time to read your “1st Prize” essay right now, I’ll read it later, I’m busy with my knitting and then I have to make supper. Just go and read a book or something”.

Other cruel communications were endless during my childhood, getting to the point where the words went in one ear and out the other ear or I disassociated. 

Those words continue to sting until this very day, for I lived in a household with toxic parents, and I’m the unloved daughter of a narcissistic mother.  I blame her for the viciousness, lack of empathy and relentless criticisms. Growing up was hell, and she accomplished that.

This well-written article below is from Gerald Schoenewolf, Ph.D. onNarcissistic Parents from PsychCentral.com/Psychoanalysis Now (blog)

Over the years I have often been asked what is the most harmful thing a parent can do to a child. There are many harmful things a parent can do, too many to point out. It is easier to focus on the kind of parent that does the most harm.

The most harmful parents are the parents who have a narcissistic need to think of themselves as great parents. Because of this need, they are unable to look at their parenting in an objective way. And they are unable to hear their children’s complaints about their parenting.

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Insomnia connection with Fibromyalgia Pain Explored

Life with Fibromyalgia:

Patients coping with the complex (pain disorder) fibromyalgia often have difficulty sleeping, and a new study published in The Journal of Pain reports that despite the negative quality of life implications, poor sleep is not a significant predictor of fibromyalgia pain intensity and duration.

The complexity of fibromyalgia as a pain disorder is rooted in the variable, patient-to-patient, influence of physical, psychological, social factors that contribute to clinical pain, and their influence often is difficult to understand. Previous research has shown that variables such as negative mood and the number of localized pain areas are significant predictors of clinical pain in fibromyalgia patients.

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Chronic Migraines ~ What’s with the Facial Pain?

This article was most interesting to me as many of my migraine pain areas are in portions of my face, where sight is impaired and the pain is excruciating. 

YES, THIS IS PART OF FIBROMYALGIA TOO , nerve pain in face and teeth,its never ending!!!:

Trigeminal Nerves

If you look at the entire nervous system only about 20% of the input to the brain comes from the spinal column! The other 80% comes from twelve sets of cranial nerves. Here is where it gets tricky. 70% of that 80% comes from the trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve is important because it provides nerve stimulation to some very important parts of the head and face such as:

  • The muscles that move the jaw
  • The lining of the sinuses
  • The temporal mandibular (TM) joints
  • The teeth
  • The muscle that tenses the ear drum
  • The joint that connects the teeth to the jaws
  • The control of the blood flow to the anterior (front) of the brain.
  • The tongue
  • The ear canal

Take a good look at this list…how many of you have complaints of ear problems? Toothaches? Sinus problems? Migraines? Jaw Pain? How many of you have been to multiple doctors and have been told that there was “nothing” wrong?

The trigeminal nerve has three branches Continue reading

What is Bell’s Palsy? Connected to Migraines?

Waking up one morning, I looked in the mirror, saw my face was droopy on one side, scaring the heck out of me.  I was in my 30’s, believing it was a stroke but relieved the diagnoses was Bell’s Palsy.  Most of the facial nerves returned to normal, however, I continue to show minor signs around my eyes and mouth area (30 years later).  It’s interesting to learn that people with migraines have a higher risk of having Bell’s Palsy.

Image: Picture of Allen Ginsberg who had Bell’s Palsy, photo by Michiel Hendryckx (Wikimedia Commons)

Bell’s palsy is a paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of your face.

The facial nerve that controls muscles on one side of the face is damaged causing that side of your face to droop, which may affect your sense of taste and how you produce tears and saliva.

This condition comes without warning. Waking up with Bell’s Palsy first thing in the morning, a person discovers that one side of their face doesn’t move, and if an eyelid is affected, blinking may be difficult.

FACTS:

1.  Bell’s Palsy typically starts suddenly, but it’s not to be confused with the condition of cerebral palsy.

2.  Links have been found between migraine, facial and limb weakness which prompted a study showing that people with migraine may be at much higher risk of having Bell’s Palsy.

3.  Most people who suddenly undergo these sudden symptoms believe they are having a stroke. However, if the weakness or paralysis only affects the face it’s likely to be diagnosed with Bell’s palsy.

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Chronic Pain? Explaining the Spoon Theory

I had never heard of “spoons” and the connection with chronic pain and frankly a bit confused.  Noticing how many fibromyalgia sufferers use the term “spoonies“, I realized how it represented the reduced amount of energy for each daily task resulting from chronic pain due to an invisible illness.

Spoon Theory Explained • Chronic Illness • Hidden Illness • POTS | EDS | Dysautonomia:

Image: pinterest.com (hubpages.stri.re)

Why am I getting headaches after exercising?

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Avoiding an after-exercise headache

You have a great work-out, then BOOM! – the dreaded after exercise headache hits. Sometimes it’s right away, sometimes a couple of hours after you’re done exercising.

What’s causing it?

There are a number of things that can cause after an exercise headache. If you already suffer from migraine, chances are that your exercise is triggering the migraine chain-reaction. It may be that the symptoms are a little different than what you’re used to – don’t let that throw you off. Chances are, it’s still migraine.

If that’s the case, you need to deal with the “big picture” – your overall migraine issue. Talk to your doctor about the various preventative medications that may be right for you. This is for you especially if you’re getting migraine symptoms a few times a month.

Your doctor also may be able to suggest a medication that you can take just before you exercise or just after, that will stop the headache before it becomes a major problem. More on that, and other tips, in this article on exercise induced headache.

Other possibilities

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Migraine World Summit 2017

I would love nothing more than to attend this summit, but when your income depends on disability payments,  money is extremely tight.  It’s iffy to travel to the U.S. these days also.

Calling all migraineurs! Do you feel like you have exhausted all treatment options and you don’t know where to turn to next? That you want answers to the questions that plague you daily that your doctor cannot give you or do you simply need help in explaining your condition to loved ones and how best […]

via Do Not Miss The Migraine World Summit 2017! — Hope Vs Headaches

Please explain clearly, the Anesthesia Procedure ‘Before’ my Surgery

When I went for gallbladder surgery a couple of years ago, it would have been less nerve-wracking had I understood the anesthesia procedure a bit better.  Sometimes doctors assume you know after they speed through talks with patients in doctor jargon. 

General Anesthesia

General anesthesia refers to total body anesthesia. The body is brought to a level of sleep where there is no sensation, memory or movement. Anesthesiologists use medications called “general anesthetics” that are given intravenously or are inhaled.

The level of anesthesia is constantly fine-tuned by the anesthesiologist for each patient. General anesthesia is reversed at the end of surgery and the patient is taken to the recovery room.

The procedure for general anesthesia goes as follows:

Prior to surgery, the anesthesiologist may collect information from the patient to determine the safest combination of drugs and dosages. This information includes:

1. Age

2. Weight

3. Health history

4. Current medication being taken (prescription, over-the-counter and herbal supplements)

5. Allergies

6. Previous anesthetics

7. Fasting time

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Do you know the top 5 Cancers Affecting Women?

Understanding the risk factors associated with these five cancers is the first step to take in minimizing your personal risk.

A cancer diagnosis can often be directly linked to your family medical history, your lifestyle choices, and your environment. You can’t control your family medical history and only some aspects of your environment are up to you. But lifestyle choices like diet, weight, activity level and smoking are yours to manage.

“Preventive measures are so heavily underutilized by people. And yet they work. Everything in moderation really works,” says Richard R. Barakat, MD, chief of the gynecology service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.

While the overall odds are that two out of three women will never get cancer, 700,000 women were diagnosed with cancer in 2008 (the most recent year for which CDC data is available), most with one of the following types:

Breast cancer accounted for 26 percent of female cancer cases and 15 percent of the 272,000 female cancer deaths that year. A woman’s odds of getting this cancer: 1 in 8

Lung and bronchus cancers accounted for 14 percent of female cancer cases and 26 percent of all deaths. A woman’s odds of getting this cancer: 1 in 16

Colon and rectal cancers accounted for 10 percent of all cancer cases and 9 percent of all deaths. A woman’s odds of getting this cancer: 1 in 19 Continue reading

Why not try this method to relieve Chronic Pain?

I’m still on the fence about this method for relieving chronic migraine pain, however, some people have said they’ve had wonderful results for their pain.

Some of the earliest medical acupuncture texts have survived since 200 B.C. and are still being used to teach students today. When you consider the fact that acupuncture has been used to treat patients for nearly 3,000 years, microsystems acupuncture is a relatively new practice.

Ear acupuncture, or (auricular therapy), is a type of acupuncture that approaches the ear as a microsystem of the body. Similar to reflexology, it treats this one body part in an attempt to treat symptoms elsewhere.

It was popularized in the 1950s by a French doctor, Dr. Paul Nogier, and was created as a bridge between Eastern and Western acupuncture. These days, most acupuncturists will use it in tandem with full-body acupuncture.

Practitioners insert very fine needles into set points in the ear, often prompting quick — sometimes immediate — results. Ear acupuncture can be used to treat chronic pain, isolated injury, stress, addiction, and more. Continue reading

Depression: How are you Coping With Pregnancy Loss?

Symptomfind.com includes an article on: “6 Important Steps for Coping with Pregnancy Loss’.

A miscarriage, or other forms of pregnancy loss, is a devastating and difficult process.  It is important to surround yourself with your family and loved ones, and take steps to take care of yourself in a healthy manner emotionally, mentally and physically.  Even though it may feel like you will never be the same again, healing will come with time.

Step #1 – It Is Okay To Grieve

~This includes: Denial, anger, guilt, depression and acceptance

Step #2 – Get Support

Step #3 – Communicate With Your Significant Other

Step #4 – Take Care Of And Protect Yourself

Step #5 – Make a Memorial

Step #6 – Moving On

Swollen Feet and Swollen Ankles – Leg Edema Explained

Medical knowledge is both important and interesting to me so thought I’d share this article.

Swollen feet and swollen ankles are common reasons why people seek medical advice. I’m not talking about inflammation due to injury or infection, but a medical condition commonly called leg edema. Leg edema is not only undesirable due to cosmetic reasons but may lead to thinning of the skin, discoloration or staining (pigmentation) and skin sores (ulcers). Healing may be […]

via Swollen Feet and Swollen Ankles – Leg Edema Explained — Doc’s Opinion

What are Pancreatic Cysts?

Pancreatic cysts are saclike pockets of fluid on or in your pancreas, a large organ behind the stomach that produces hormones and enzymes that help digest food.

Most pancreatic cysts aren’t cancerous, and many don’t cause symptoms. They’re typically found during imaging testing for another problem. Some are actually noncancerous (benign) pockets of fluids lined with scar or inflammatory tissue, not the type of cells found in true cysts (pseudocysts).

But some pancreatic cysts can be or can become cancerous. Your doctor might take a sample of the pancreatic cyst fluid to determine if cancer cells are present. Or your doctor might recommend monitoring a cyst over time for changes that indicate cancer.

Types of Pancreatic Cysts

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What’s the difference: Pneumonia vs. Walking Pneumonia?

What is walking pneumonia?  How is it different from regular pneumonia?

PNEUMONIA

Pneumonia is an infection that inflames the air sacs in one or both lungs. The air sacs may fill with fluid or pus (purulent material), causing cough with phlegm or pus, fever, chills, and difficulty breathing. A variety of organisms, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can cause pneumonia.

Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to life-threatening. It is most serious for infants and young children, people older than age 65, and people with health problems or weakened immune systems.

Signs and Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe, depending on factors such as the type of germ causing the infection, and your age and overall health. Mild signs and symptoms often are similar to those of a cold or flu, but they last longer.

Signs and symptoms of pneumonia may include:

–Chest pain when you breathe or cough

–Confusion or changes in mental awareness (in adults age 65 and older)

–Cough, which may produce phlegm

–Fatigue

–Fever, sweating and shaking chills

–Lower than normal body temperature (in adults older than age 65 and people with weak immune systems)

–Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea

–Shortness of breath

Newborns and infants may not show any sign of the infection. Or they may vomit, have a fever and cough, appear restless or tired and without energy, or have difficulty breathing and eating.

When to see a doctor

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What is Huntington’s Disease?

You don’t hear much about this disease, and I found it extremely interesting to read about.

Quick Answer: Huntington’s disease is an incurable, hereditary brain disorder. It is a devastating disease for which there is no currently “effective” treatment.

Nerve cells become damaged, causing various parts of the brain to deteriorate. The disease affects movement, behavior and cognition – the affected individuals’ abilities to walk, think, reason and talk are gradually eroded to such a point that they eventually become entirely reliant on other people for their care.

Huntington’s disease has a major emotional, mental, social and economic impact on the lives of patients, as well as their families. Continue reading

Triggering Triggers (PTSD)

Trigger Warning!!

Triggers can pop up just about anywhere.  Just when you think that you have tackled an issue, whether it is dealing with a traumatic experience or re-living memories in a disorder called (PTSD), post-traumatic stress disorder, triggers may resurface.

A trigger is something that sets off a memory tape or flashback transporting the person back to the event of her/his original trauma.  PsychCental.com

For me, traveling the tough therapy road, confronting issues relating back to my horrid past of childhood sexual and emotional abuse (PTSD), I lived with flashbacks and frightening dreams.  Certain smells, certain surroundings…..hard to pinpoint, can trigger a recollection.  Luckily, I have moved on with my life and can swiftly shove these painful thoughts aside.  It took years though to be able to achieve this.

A couple of years ago, a tough test for me tackling triggers was put to the test.  Nine years of hospitalizations ended in 2002, and I had not visited the inside of any hospital ward since that time.  My psychiatrist’s office was in the hospital, and although I had to pass by the doors to the ward for each appointment with him, it never bothered me due to the fact that I was an outpatient now.

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What is codependency? Am I codependent?

The term “codependency” was coined more than 20 years ago by authors who studied the negative impact of drug and alcohol use on families. Since then, use of the term has been expanded to include a pattern of psychologically unhealthy behaviors that are learned by individuals as a way of coping with a family environment marked by ignored or denied emotional turmoil.

Most people are able to enjoy a sense of healthy, mutual interdependence in their lives. However, people with codependency seem to habitually form relationships that are one-sided and emotionally destructive.

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Lupus: Help, I’m losing my Hair ~ Tips to Prevent Hair Loss

Many of these tips apply to everyone taking medications

Hair loss is a huge concern to many lupus sufferers, at times very slight and unnoticeable or unfortunately for some, it can be quite severe causing significant anguish.

The list of tips below may help you prevent lupus hair loss:

Is it Lupus or my Medication?

Determine the reason for your hair loss. Could it be lupus or perhaps your hair loss may be caused due to the medication you’re taking? If it’s medication-related, please consult with your doctor about possibly changing medications.

Follow Your Medication Instructions

Always take your medication as instructed including the right time of day. Don’t skip your medication for any reason, and phone your pharmacist or doctor if you have any questions.  This is extremely important.

Start your Lupus Treatment As Soon As Possible

Lupus treatment should begin immediately preventing you less anguish from hair loss.  Consult with your doctor and insist on getting a diagnosis as quickly as possible if you show any signs of lupus.

Always Be Aware of the Medication Prescribed Continue reading

Hey, are you filling my prescriptions properly? Beware!! 4 Pharmacy errors that can spell danger

This is critical information for everyone.  Each time you pick up your prescription – check it!!

How to avoid pharmacy mix-ups that can mean serious consequences for your health

How often do serious pharmacy errors happen? Actually, nobody knows. There is little data tracking the problem across Canada.  So what do you need to know to stay safe? Here are four errors to watch out for that can have serious consequences for your health.

CBC News and Marketplace have been investigating pharmacy errors for several months in the largest hidden-camera test of its kind in Canada. Follow our continuing coverage at cbcnews.ca. Watch the complete investigation, Dispensing Danger, on Friday at 8 p.m. on CBC TV and online.

According to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Canada, medication problems are often caused by a combination of factors. Here are some problems to watch out for:

Illegible prescriptions

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What is Hashimoto’s disease?

Valuable information on autoimmune disease and your thyroid gland 

Hashimoto’s disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or autoimmune thyroiditis, is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease is a disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks the body’s own cells and organs. Normally, the immune system protects the body from infection by identifying and destroying bacteria, viruses, and other potentially harmful foreign substances.

In Hashimoto’s disease, the immune system attacks the thyroid gland, causing inflammation and interfering with its ability to produce thyroid hormones. Large numbers of white blood cells called lymphocytes accumulate in the thyroid. Lymphocytes make the antibodies that start the autoimmune process.

Hashimoto’s disease often leads to reduced thyroid function or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the thyroid doesn’t make enough thyroid hormone for the body’s needs. Thyroid hormones regulate metabolism—the way the body uses energy—and affect nearly every organ in the body. Without enough thyroid hormone, many of the body’s functions slow down. Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States.

What are the symptoms of Hashimoto’s disease?

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7 Outstanding Tips for Traveling with Back Pain

Image result for back pain

Back pain has millions of sufferers and traveling can be horrendous.  Sitting in one position for a long flight or lugging heavy luggage around just increases the misery, but who doesn’t wish to travel and explore the world?

These are some excellent tips to help lessen your pain while traveling:

1. Schedule your flights wisely

Traveling with back pain can be miserable, especially on a plane.  You are sometimes the one stuck in an economy-class seat, with little room, leaving your spine feeling out of whack.   To minimize time in the air, some travelers choose to book non-stop flights if available.

2. Get up and move, move, move

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7 other pains worse than childbirth

As a chronic migraine sufferer who has never given birth, I’m incapable of comparing pain. On a scale of 1-10 (as doctors insist on using), my excruciating pain sometimes exceeds 10+, but, I can envision childbirth close or equal. Let’s face it, any horrible pain is a horrible pain.

7 Horrible Types of Pain (not in particular order)

(people at random said)

1.   Toothache

2.   Migraines

3.   Trigeminal Neuralgia

4.   Gout

5.   Serious Burns

6.  Pudendal Neuralgia

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BINGE EATING DISORDER ~ Different from Anorexia and Bulimia

binge eating

I was searching for information on bingeing and came across this article on (News-Medical.net), where they wrote that binge eating disorder is different from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

It was stated that food addiction is not yet recognized as a mental disorder but certain obese individuals clearly display addictive-like behavior towards food.  To achieve a formal diagnostic status, ‘food addiction’ requires a stronger evidence base to support the claim that certain ingredients have addictive properties identical to addictive drugs of abuse.  This topic is up for debate in the session, ‘Binge eating obesity is a food addiction’.

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Is there a Link between Caffeine and Depression?

COFFEE1

What is the relationship between caffeine and depression? Does caffeine make depression worse?

The exact relationship between caffeine and depression isn’t clear.  There’s no evidence that caffeine — a mild stimulant — causes depression.  However, some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than are others. In such individuals, caffeine may worsen existing depression.  How or why this occurs isn’t clear.  But several theories exist.

·         Although caffeine initially gives you a “lift,” it may later have the opposite effect as the effects of the caffeine wear off.

·         Caffeine can make it more difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep.  A lack of sleep can worsen depression.

·         Caffeine appears to have some effect on blood sugar, especially in people with diabetes.  Fluctuations in blood sugar can be associated with mood changes.

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