PTSD ~ Marriage is Supposed to be for Love

My guest post today is from Mariah’s blog “Recluse“.

I remember the day I realized that I was in an abusive marriage. I called my mom, who lived 800 miles away blurting out my abuse and fear. I will also never forget how she responded. Mom expressed her opinions and words, and it was if blinders were removed from my eyes.

That was the day I recognized that my husband was violent and things weren’t about to change.

The Beginning

When I was in my first marriage, I was very young.  I was 20 when we were married, and I had been with him since I was 17.  Needless to say, I was hell-bent on making it work, because I was “an adult now” and that’s what “adults” did.  They kept their promises, paid their bills and took care of their responsibilities.  Except when they don’t things begin to change.

Soon after getting married, my ex-husband slowly started to show his true colors.  Long story short, he was emotionally and verbally abusive, manipulated our finances, was addicted to pornography and video games, had drinking problems, and he had an affair outside of our marriage.

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I Will Overcome The Abuse

I’m proud that you are voicing your words now.

Bruised But Not Broken

I have words to speak, but my tongue is

still numb from the flavour of your lies.

I have a truth to tell, but i’m not sure

whetherto swallow it.

Keep it buried where it’s

always belonged.

Who I really am, living in my

stomach,

making a home behind my ribcage,

stifling my wings.

I have a decade of stories, bursting behind

swollen lips and flustered cheeks, shame

carriedin my face.

I want to find my voice, but I think it got

buried beneath yours in my throat and I

can’t remember what I sound like.

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Is it all because of Genitals?

Ok, so here’s the story:

A women-only spa in Toronto, Ontario, Canada took some massive criticism and triggered a social-media outcry last week, that prohibits some transgender women from using their facilities.

On Facebook, a woman stated that she refused to revisit the spa on account that they canceled her friend’s (who is transgender) appointment due to their spa’s policy which states “no male genitals” rule.

The spa explained, “because we are a bathing-suit-optional environment, our current policy is to ensure all clients are comfortable in an environment with nudity, including minors.”

The backlash was extreme from the public, transgender and LGBTQ communities. However, the spa further clarified that it’s a ‘single-sex facility with full nudity, and unlike other facilities.’  They stated they supported these communities, but the spa has policies to adhere to.

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PTSD ~ Are you highly sensitive?

Hypervigilance | Highly Sensitive

This describes me.  As a person with PTSD, I always feel “on guard”, and automatically scan a room if it’s a gathering with friends, a crowd of people or anywhere outside my home.  Perhaps it’s a trust issue or maybe I don’t ever feel completely comfortable. Does this describe you?

PTSD ~ Those ‘Dirty Little Secrets’

I’ve written many posts about my PTSD (childhood sexual abuse); which was a ‘dirty little secret.’  Have you held on to secrets for years and years?

Recollecting my past, at around eight years old, while my friends and I played in our yard, the predator next door sat on his veranda puffing on a cigarette or repairing whatever under the hood of his car.

I was panicked for them and me, wanting so much to convey to them of the sexual abuse at the hands of this man, yet at the same time felt bewildered.

I had a secret; an ugly little secret, to something that I didn’t cause – or did I?

There was the distressing apology, forced by my parents to blurt out and recite with sincerity to this predator for abusing me.  That sincerity was met with confusion wondering how I wronged in the first place.  All kinds of feelings swished around: guilt, helplessness, and I was embarrassed.

A 30-year-old man is forcing sex on a child.  Would that warrant an apology?

Perplexing also was permitting this predator into our home for Sunday dinners.  Were my parents attempting to soothe the predator’s feelings for being wrongly accused?

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The Multiple Risks of Benzodiazepine Use

benzodiazepenes

Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs that became widely used in the 1970s for their ability to reduce panic, anxiety, and insomnia. Some also functioned as anticonvulsants, reducing seizures. They are considered “downers,” with sedating qualities.

New research shows that benzodiazepine use, particularly long-term use, comes with risks such as increased mortality and mood instability.

At a 2015 scientific meeting, researcher Jari Tiihonen reported that among 21,492 patients with schizophrenia in Sweden, benzodiazepine use was associated with increased mortality, while antidepressant and antipsychotic use decreased mortality.

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Narcissistic Grandmother And Your Children

This is a ‘must read’ for anyone who has suffered the impact of maternal narcissistic abuse and now your mother is a grandmother to your children.  Perish the thought!

If you have children who have been exposed to your narcissistic personality disordered mother, protect them from further exposure.

Source: Narcissistic Grandmother And Your Children

Do you know what Tardive Dyskinesia is?

FDA Approves Treatment for Tardive Dyskinesia

A new drug valbenazine (trade name Ingrezza) has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia.

Tardive dyskinesia, a side effect of long-term use of antipsychotic medication, consists of involuntary movements of the tongue, face, torso, arms, and legs. It can interfere with walking, talking, and breathing.

The approval followed 20 clinical trials of valbenazine that included a total of more than 1000 participants who had symptoms of tardive dyskinesia in addition to schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder.

In a 2017 article in the American Journal of Psychiatry, researcher Robert A. Hauser and colleagues reported that patients who received 80 mg/day of valbenazine had a significant reduction in tardive dyskinesia symptoms after six weeks compared to those who received placebo. Participants who received 40 mg/day of valbenazine also had reductions in symptoms, although not as dramatic as with the higher dose.

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Financial Abuse ~ A form of Elder Abuse

How can people live with themselves when taking advantage of others?  I wouldn’t be able to sleep at night knowing I was ripping off a relative.  

Financial abuse is a form of abuse that often goes hand in hand with other abuses.  It’s also an all too common form of elder abuse. Anyone who is frail, sick, in an institution or unable to handle their own finances completely and with understanding, is vulnerable to financial abuse. 

Frequently, financial abuse is a part of domestic abuse, being employed as a way of controlling the victim and preventing her from being able to escape the abusive relationship.

Financial abuse is often a part of another abuse such as domestic violence or emotional/psychological abuse or even bullying. It can result from drug or alcohol addictions too.

What is Financial Abuse?

Financial abuse is any abuse involving money. It can be perpetrated by an individual or an organisation. If someone forces you to take money from your account to give to them, takes money from you, pressures you into giving them money, borrows from you and refuses to repay the loan, forces you to sign something without explaining the full implications or allowing you to read the small print, takes your benefits or charges for services you have not received or requested, it is financial abuse.

Financial abuse can also involve cowboy traders who undertake work and leave a substandard job after receiving payment.

Financial abuse in domestic abuse/domestic violence

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MENTAL ILLNESS: Should I Apologize?

WHERE WOULD YOU BE IF IT WEREN’T FOR MENTAL ILLNESS?

WHERE WOULD YOU BE IF IT WEREN’T FOR DEPRESSION?

This thought has crossed my mind many times over the years, forever questioning what my life would be like without mental illness.

Beginning in the mid-1990’s, this illness first tossed me into a life of bleak depressive despair, feeling hopeless and helpless, coupled with hospitalizations, countless medications, and ineffective ECTs. With it came a loss of so many things, as well as myself. I found myself apologizing for being ill, but why? Apologizing for an illness?

For one, I kissed my livelihood goodbye. As an accounting supervisor, I had a well-paying position, enjoyed my job and colleagues, and imagined I would have continued with my career with that company.

A misfortune, becoming so ill with depression and hospitalizations, I ultimately lost my job, then hanging on for over two years frantically waiting for government disability to kick in. You discover swiftly to become thrifty.

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PTSD – The Trauma Tree

I thought this was an excellent infographic explaining all forms of PTSD and displaying the horrific impact it has on a person in the future. 

Trauma Tree - this is a good graphic of how symptoms can grow from trauma and ignoring the issues. With good therapy, coping skills and support these symptoms can be more controllable:

Source: http://eyemovementdesensitizationandreprocessing.com/emdr-side-effects/

Letting Go…

A must read! An excellent post by a blogger who is writing to her narcissistic mother.

redheadedhousewife

These words have been very hard to write and I have postponed this post for awhile. It is personal, heartfelt, dark and honest. I am releasing my inner most honest heartbroken feelings.  I need to let go of the pain & heartache I carry with me.  It is no secret that I have a very difficult with the one person who should be my biggest fan. I have and always have had very deep, dark & painful feelings about our relationship. I don’t remember every feeling like you wanted me. I feel like you had expectations of who and what you thought I should be but I’ve never measured up to what you wanted. So you used me as your proverbial verbal punching bag.

I was a good kid. I did pretty well in school. I never got in trouble at school and maintained the honor roll through High School. I have never done drugs. I have never even gotten drunk. Even as an adult today, I will have…

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Have you ever heard about Silent Migraines?

How migraines without headache pain can wreak havoc on your health

Did you know you could have what’s called a ‘silent migraine‘ without actually having a headache?  Surprisingly, migraines can occur without the classic pulsing head pain. In fact, about 3 to 5% of people with chronic migraines experience such headache-free migraines, known as “silent migraines.” But how can you know when you’re having one if you’re not in pain?

Silent Migraine Sufferers’ Profile

Silent migraines occur in older adults who have previously suffered full migraine symptoms, headache and all.

In other cases, adults over age 40 develop these headache-less migraines out of the blue. Here are six names associated with silent migraines:

  • Acephalgic migraine: Acephalgic is the Latin word for “without head pain”
  • Isolated visual migraine
  • Late-onset migraine accompaniment: Occurs when the condition first strikes someone over the age of 40
  • Migraine dissocié: The French name for a migraine that is dissociated from (that is, not related to) headache
  • Migraine equivalent or migraine variant
  • Typical aura without headache

MigraineS

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Have you experienced a Dual Diagnosis?

Dual diagnosis is a term for when someone experiences a mental illness and a substance abuse problem simultaneously. Dual diagnosis is a very broad category. It can range from someone developing mild depression because of binge drinking, to someone’s symptoms of bipolar disorder becoming more severe when that person abuses heroin during periods of mania.

Either substance abuse or mental illness can develop first. A person experiencing a mental health condition may turn to drugs and alcohol as a form of self-medication to improve the troubling mental health symptoms they experience.

Research shows though that drugs and alcohol only make the symptoms of mental health conditions worse. Abusing substances can also lead to mental health problems because of the effects drugs have on a person’s moods, thoughts, brain chemistry and behavior.

See more at:  NAMI.org

Study shows: Chronic Pain showing in adults with Anxiety or Depression

In a survey of adults with anxiety or a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder, about half reported experiencing chronic pain, according to researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. The findings are published online in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

“The dual burden of chronic physical conditions and mood and anxiety disorders is a significant and growing problem,” said Silvia Martins, MD, PhD, associate professor of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health, and senior author.

The research examined survey data to analyze associations between DSM-IV-diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders and self-reported chronic physical conditions among 5,037 adults in São Paulo, Brazil. Participants were also interviewed in person.

Among individuals with a mood disorder, chronic pain was the most common, reported by 50 percent, followed by respiratory diseases at 33 percent, cardiovascular disease at 10 percent, arthritis reported by 9 percent, and diabetes by 7 percent.

Anxiety disorders were also common for those with chronic pain disorder at 45 percent, and respiratory at 30 percent, as well as arthritis and cardiovascular disease, each 11 percent.

Individuals with two or more chronic diseases had increased odds of a mood or anxiety disorder. Hypertension was associated with both disorders at 23 percent.

“These results shed new light on the public health impact of the dual burden of physical and mental illness,” said Dr. Martins. “Chronic disease coupled with a psychiatric disorder is a pressing issue that health providers should consider when designing preventive interventions and treatment services — especially the heavy mental health burden experienced by those with two or more chronic diseases.”

Article source: ScienceDaily.com

Image: cherished79.com

 

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Welcome – Connecting With Everyone Struggling With All Invisible Illnesses

“Living in Stigma” connects with everyone coping with chronic pain, mental illness, and all invisible illnesses.

My blog Living in Stigma was launched in 2007 and originally dedicated to all of us struggling with mental illness.  I felt as if I was living in stigma with my own major depression.

Many forms of mental illness comprise of DepressionBipolar Disorder, Personality Disorders, PTSD, Eating Disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and much more.

I struggle with both mental illness and chronic migraines, and with news articles, social media, research and valued readers sharing comments and opinions on my blog, it’s a reality that invisible illnesses such as fibromyalgia, lupus, headaches, recurring back and leg pain, and so many more are also a vast portion of invisible illness stigma.  Continue reading

“Frail Thread” – Nayana Nair — it rains in my heart

These lines that connect to my heart, pass through landscapes devoid of human presence. This frail thread passes through valley of flowers that have no color. Through balconies overlooking desolate streets and sky crowded with stars. Through stairs leading to floors that no one visits. Through the branches of old trees broken in the storms. […]

via “Frail Thread” – Nayana Nair — it rains in my heart

The Impact Of Celiac Disease on Mental Health — Slay Girl Society

Here’s a question that you probably don’t consider every day – how does celiac disease impact a person’s mental health? In honour of Celiac Awareness Month (which is ending today!) I wanted to explore this idea a little bit on the blog. So what is celiac disease? According to the Canadian Celiac Association, celiac disease […]

via The Impact Of Celiac Disease on Mental Health — Slay Girl Society

STIGMA – And Mental Illness

What is stigma?

When someone appears to be different than us, we may view him or her in a negative stereotyped manner.  People who have identities that society values negatively are said to be stigmatized.

Stigma is a reality for people with a mental illness, and they report that how others judge them is one of their greatest barriers to a complete and satisfying life.  Society feels uncomfortable about mental illness. It is not seen like other illnesses such as heart disease and cancer.

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Your first appointment with a Psychiatrist, are you prepared?

Reflecting on my first appointment, I was clearly unprepared and this article would have come in handy.  Bringing someone would have helped immensely, and when the pdoc asked if there were any questions, it would have prevented me from sitting there looking stunned. 

This article was written by: Natasha Tracy on Healthyplace.com

Recently, someone wrote me and asked how to best handle a first psychiatric appointment. This is a good question because, essentially, people are walking into the vast unknown. If you’ve never seen a psychiatrist before, how could you possibly know what to expect? And, the kicker of that is, the doctor will be asking you why you’re there. So you’re supposed to know what to say when he says that. So how do you handle your first psychiatric appointment?

Write Down What Concerns You Before Your Psychiatric Appointment

Many people get in front of a psychiatrist a freeze, completely forgetting all the issues that brought them there in the first place. This is extremely common. So, before you head off for your first psychiatric appointment write down all your concerns. Everything that has been odd and everything that you think might be odd should go down on the list, with examples.

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Avoid these 10 foods for Killer Migraines

Image: Living in Stigma cherished79.com

Every day, millions of people across the world suffer from migraine headaches. They come on quickly and viciously and invariably ruin your day. Often, these headaches are caused by certain foods. Knowing which foods are most likely to cause your migraine headaches can provide a vital step in determining what your headache triggers are, and help you avoid these unpleasant episodes in the future.

Alcohol

Red wine is a famous headache trigger, but many people don’t realize that all alcohols, particularly dark liquors, have the potential to be headache triggers. While the causative agents for migraines are not well known, it is postulated that the histamines and tyramines present in alcohol may act to promote headaches. Added to this is the dehydrating effect of drinking alcohol, which, as we all know, can be a surefire way to get a splitting headache.

Caffeine

Headaches are caused not by caffeine itself, but by the withdrawal symptoms experienced afterward. Research indicates that a withdrawal headache can result after ingesting approximately 200 milligrams of caffeine, which amounts to around 2–3 cups of coffee. Stick to just one cup of coffee a day and lay off the cans of coke to avoid these withdrawal headaches.

Cheese

While the research regarding cheese as a migraine precursor is limited, it is thought that aged cheeses such as Swiss, cheddar, Gouda, Parmesan and blue cheese are more likely to give you a headache. This is due to the greater concentrations of tyramine in these cheeses, which forms as the proteins in cheese break down over time.

Monosodium glutamate

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7 Interesting signs showing you are Highly Creative

Creativity knows no bounds. But we as humans are finite, so where does that leave us with creativity?

Truth be told, having the gift to create is not evident to all. It is through our innate and rather inhuman ability to dedicate time and hone our crafts until we achieve awe-inspiring greatness which serves as the true measure of creativity.

While there are starving artists who put value in the quality of their meticulous creations, some are just are as artistic without having to adhere to certain cliches that limit the worldview of what creativity truly means.

In fact, you, dear reader, may be one of these highly creative people who are not fully aware of their gift.

To make sure that you are indeed a creative person, refer to the signs below and see if you exhibit any of these.

1. You like to solve problems

Whether it’s playing sudoku or doing your math homework, both of which require you to flex your problem-solving muscles, your propensity for finding solutions to the problems in front of you is a sign of creative mind. While there is the debate on whether creativity and critical thinking work in the same plane of consciousness, both are nonetheless interconnected because problems let you draw solutions from your knowledge and experience.

2. You are highly motivated

There is a beautiful stubbornness that exists within motivation. While it encourages bull-headedness and a determined mentality, motivation allows us to pursue our passions to the extent of our finiteness, if not beyond it. According to Gordon Torr’s book Managing Creative People, the higher the intrinsic motivation (doing something for its sake), the greater the creativity of that person will be.

Two things define you. Your patience when you have nothing, and your attitude when you have everything.: 3. You are courageous

Success is never achieved overnight. You will have to fail countless of times before getting it right. By the time Thomas Edison was able to develop thousands of patents and created revolutionary devices (which laid the groundwork for the technology we use today), his teachers have told him that he was “stupid to learn anything” and was fired in this first two jobs for not being productivity.

Lesser men would cave in and submit to defeat, but rejection will only fire the courage in creative people like Edison to not only prove their naysayers wrong but also pursue their passions regardless of popular belief.

4. You love playing

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7 Things People Ask When my Mental Illness is Showing

Recluse

I lived for 25 years trying to hide the fact that I am unique. Different.  Broken.  Etc.  Let me tell you, it’s exhausting to run from yourself for so long.  Only my closest family members and friends had been clued in on the details of my mental illness(es).
However, over the past 6 months, I have decided that it’s okay to stop pretending and stop hiding. It’s okay that I’m not perfect.  It’s okay to love myself.  It’s okay.  As a result, I receive many weird looks and questions from people around me.

I really encourage you to ask questions if you love someone who is struggling with mental illness.  Take some time and try to get into their world.  We all experience it differently.  It means something different to each of us.

It means so much to me that people ask me questions, even though some of them are…

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What do you do when someone is talking of suicide?

Thanks for posting this, you could be helping many people with your words of wisdom. I’m proud of you for surviving the hell of mental illness and reaching out for help. Stay strong.

thesassyclover

The last couple of months I have been going through a lot of things. The depression is getting worse and the thoughts of ending my life has been running through my head. Serious thoughts. What did I do? I reached out crying to both of my parents. My dad listens; my mom just stares at me. I tried talking to her today and all she said was that she knows I am going through something and then walked away.


I would never do that to someone. The simple fact that one of my diagnosis’ is Sjrogren syndrome and that means it is hard to produce tears. I rarely can actually cry. The fact I have been crying is a sign that something is wrong and yet, my family just walks away.

I made a promise that I would never end my life. I don’t want my family and friends go…

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Trauma Therapy ~ 4 Important Things to Look For

To heal from trauma means finally dealing with the source of the trauma, whether it’s childhood abuse or neglect, combat experiences, or a natural disaster or a violent assault. How can this be done, however, when trauma provokes such negative and overwhelming feelings – feelings that most try hard to keep safely buried?

Therapy can be a vital step, helping the person feel safe enough to revisit their trauma without being retraumatized in the process. Getting the right support is key, however. Not only is it important to connect with a therapist well-versed in effective therapeutic approaches, it’s also vital to seek out a person with whom you feel a personal connection.

Multiple studies confirm that a person who feels good about their relationship with their therapist is more likely to have a positive outcome. A recent study from Bowling Green State University researchers takes the concept a step further, noting that a deep connection between a therapist and patient can lead to “sacred moments” that increase well-being on both sides.

With that in mind, here are four things to look for to make your therapeutic experience most effective:

Knowledge. Your therapist should, of course, be up to date on treatment options – techniques such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which teaches new ways of thinking of old experiences; neurofeedback, which can help rewire the brain to overcome trauma-induced changes; equine therapy, which can be a helpful supplement for those who find it hard to trust human connections; and EMDR, which can help with the process of moving beyond the past.

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EVER BEEN BLAMED FOR BEING SEXUALLY ASSAULTED? GRAPHIC CONTENT. POSSIBLE TRIGGER WARNING.

Trigger Warning!!! Excellent post.

GIRL OUTSPOKEN

I have!

If you have stumbled across this post, well then I’ very sorry, because it probably means you have also been blamed for being sexually abused. I want to share a story with you. A story that is still very hard for me to tell, but if i can help someone who has been through something similar, then that makes this post worth it. It’s a long one, so brace yourself.

IT WASN’T SOMETHING I EVER EXPECTED TO HAPPEN TO ME.

First off, I’m sure all of us who have experienced something like this will know that phrase all too well. lets be honest, no body ever thinks it will happen to them. until it does.

I WAS ALWAYS CAREFUL, HOW DID THIS HAPPEN?

It doesn’t matter how careful you are, if it’s going to happen, then it will. I was always sensible, never trusted strangers, never did anything…

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