Does life make you feel like an insecure piece of fluff?

SHEEP1

 Usually, when someone is referred to as ‘confident‘ they are referring to self-confidence.

 Self-confidence is faith in one’s own abilities. People with high self-confidence typically have little fear of the unknown, are able to stand up for what they believe in, and have the courage to risk embarrassment (for instance, by giving a presentation to a large group of people). One who is self-confident is not necessarily loud, brash, or reckless.

Confidence as a psychological quality is related to, but distinct from, self-esteem. Self-esteem is usually lost as a result of other losses. Losing confidence is no longer trusting in the ability to perform.

My self-confidence and self-esteem went down the toilet very shortly after my first hospitalization back in the mid-1990’s and never really returned, even to this day. The gigantic hands of depression held onto me ever so tight, I lost my thinking process, the career I built and mostly what I lost was me.

I went from working full-time as an accounting supervisor for a large manufacturing corporation, to essentially a ‘piece of fluff. People routinely came to me for answers, and when in the hospital, I spent my days sitting in solitude or meandering the hospital halls to pass the time. Was this the life I was sentenced to?

It was incredible the change in me; virtually a child standing behind her mother’s dress frightened to ask or speak up. I was even nervous ordering a pizza via the telephone. Previously, I was forever the one who would enter a room, introduce herself, perform a speech and feel right at ease.

Mental illness does this to a human being; and instead of possessing that comfortable leather skin that gets us through the rough situations, we find ourselves now only dressed in chiffon. You feel flawed.

These are rough roads and undeserved journeys. Some of us have taken these roads/journeys repeatedly, and question when will the “under construction” terminate, giving way to smooth, fresh pavement.

It took years to recover and land back on my feet. I revisited the working world, however, only some of the self-confidence and self-esteem returned; just enough to get me by. Starting all over and learning new computer systems and methods were incredibly difficult, yet I managed to endure employment for 6 years before dark depression struck once again and now find myself unable to work.

I recognize I still lack it, and living jobless makes a difference, away from the working world, not connected to people sometimes hurls you into your own little world where you get to escape and become too comfortable. At times, I’d still rather hide, but I know I can’t, therefore, compelled to be somewhat “self-confident” looking and sounding.

Actually, this self-esteem/confidence thing is a lot of self-talk, and the support has to be there as you begin the “baby steps”.

Written and copyrighted by Deb McCarthy/2017

(edited and repost)

4 thoughts on “Does life make you feel like an insecure piece of fluff?

  1. Pieces of Bipolar says:

    Your post spoke to me. I’m still ‘under construction’ trying to juggle bipolar, a messy divorce and a few failed relationship. Spend more and more time withdrawn and isolated. It just feels safer that way

    Like

    • cherished79 says:

      It is safer, and I spent too many years staying safe. Depression/mental illness robs you of self-confidence, self-esteem and you go from wanting to leave the house to just wanting to be left alone. I used to run meetings at my job, train personnel, manage staff, then depression took over ~ could I do that now? No way. I don’t even work anymore and am afraid to run into any former colleagues for fear of “what would I talk about”.

      I’m a bit more outgoing now, yet still housebound most times and usually writing on my laptop which is isolating in itself.
      See my article on “Handcuffed to my House“. That’s how bad it was. https://cherished79.wordpress.com/?s=handcuffed+to+my+house

      Thanks for commenting and stay strong. 🙂 Deb

      Liked by 1 person

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