What is PTSD? PTSD Awareness

It fails to mention here, find an experienced trauma therapist to work with you and your PTSD.  This is crucial.

27 thoughts on “What is PTSD? PTSD Awareness

    • cherished79 says:

      I do too. Some have commented that the chart is too simplified, and while it is I posted it as a quick overview of PTSD. If you created a true infographic on PTSD, it wouldn’t ever cover everything, plus it would be so long it would look ridicules in #0.2 font!

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  1. Robert Matthew Goldstein says:

    Reblogged this on Art by Rob Goldstein and commented:

    This is excellent information and a great introduction to the “cues” that trigger the physiological responses that cause the emotional anguish of PTSD and CPTSD. And what I’m about to say is not meant to diminish the information on this chart.

    This chart is based on the behavioral model, and thus recommends the short term behavioral interventions that sometimes provide long term results for a small group of people. These short term treatment also happen to be preferred by the HOMO’s that made Behaviorism central to the U.S. Mental Health System.

    The treatment I don’t see on this chart is psychotherapy.
    PTSD is not a behavior and in cases of severe PTSD behavioral interventions are useless. That’s not to say that minding your thoughts and reminding yourself to laugh don’t have their place. But I’m not a child. I’m a complex adult. I know how to behave. I want to know who I am under the PTSD and a person, and I need someone who understands that struggle. I’ve never met a behaviorist with the skill it takes to understand the struggle for to find ones authentic self.

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    • cherished79 says:

      This really is meant for the people who wonder what the letters PTSD stand for, and also. perhaps the public who wonders what the fuss is all about. I really hope just eyeing this they will look further into it and not pass judgement so quickly. If they’ve never experienced it themselves or lived with a family member then they should keep their opinions to themselves and research. Struggling with CPTSD is a lifetime nightmare, and I’m still dealing with it at age 59 in therapy about the abuse that has impacted me since I was 6 years old.

      Thanks so much for your comment, appreciate you stopping by.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Robert Matthew Goldstein says:

        Thank you for taking my re0blog in the spirit of collaboration. I think it takes courage to put yourself on the line; especially if CPTSD is your diagnosis.

        We run the risk of traumatizing ourselves when we do this.

        Your post was perfect as an introduction; it is accurate because behaviorism is half right about most things and your post is perfect for people who aren’t ready to wrap their minds around the esoteric aspects of the trauma experience.

        How does one explain what it means to wake up feeling like a five year old?

        How does one explain the trauma symptom of having split off parts with names and separate lives?

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        • cherished79 says:

          Perfectly said, and how does one function when he/she does wake up feeling like a five year old from a terrifying dream and have to go to work? The nightmare stays with you throughout the day, yet you must perform as the adult. Many times this happened to me as I worked as a call centre agent in collections calling people for overdue credit payments. Tempers flared on both ends, and actually, I did quite well collecting, however, I found myself in the washroom bawling many times due to overwhelming emotions.

          My company and colleagues were unaware of my depression, and of course, PTSD, so I had to be a big girl and suck it up. Then you perhaps have a trigger on the way home, it just never ends. I having been dissociating too many times lately, however, have never actually split; I feel for you, that must be frightening and I’m proud of you for staying strong. Hugs, Deb

          Liked by 1 person

    • cherished79 says:

      Thank you for reblogging and finding me. I see a psychologist who specializes in (sexual abuse) trauma therapy and was lucky to finally find someone who knew what the hell she was doing. The first one I had was way over her head and it was a disaster. She should have called a “cease and desist” order, my case was too complex; sometimes they have too large of an ego. 🙂

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      • Robert Matthew Goldstein says:

        I’m lucky too.

        I once saw a psychiatrist who was ot experienced enough to understand why her medicines didn’t work…rather than ask herself if I needed more than pills she decided to label me ‘schizo-affective’.

        Fortunately I research everything and realized that I met none of the criteria so I refused to take the pills she prescribed and she dumped me.

        What gave me a clue was that in the interim I saw a psychologist who said: “Your emotional range is unusually broad for a man your age.”

        It would take a few more years before I would get the right diagnosis but the people that lead me toward the treatment I needed were the professionals who were trained to respect the complexity of the human mind and the diversity of human experience.

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        • cherished79 says:

          You have to look out for You. During my rough depression years in the early ’90’s, there was no internet, so the next best thing was a pdoc shoving his 6″ medical book at me full of psych jargon on depression. Did I understand it no, was I too ill to read it, yes, did I really care, no. All I knew that something was very wrong with me, I wanted to die, leave this hellish world and no doctor’s potions were helping. As far as I was concerned, these docs must have received their diplomas via a matchbook cover college. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Cheyanne says:

    Man, the best therapist I ever had was a lady that was a refugee from Bosnia. She was an older lady and sometimes I had the hardest time understanding her accent, but she was THE BEST. She didn’t cry when I talked about my past like the other therapists did, or ask me stupid questions like, “if your trauma was a picture, what would it look like?” or any stupid shit like that. She was frank, brutally honest and actually GOT SOMEWHERE with me (EMDR). Then she had to have an emergency surgery and was on disability for a while. By the time she was able to work again my insurance had changed and I couldn’t afford to go see her anymore. But seriously. She was THE BEST. Probably because she had lived through some REAL SHIT.

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    • cherished79 says:

      I don’t know if the therapist I’m seeing now has been through abuse or witnessed abuse, but she is an experienced trauma therapist. The first one I had when diagnosed with PTSD was unqualified and caused major damage. I’m so happy you experienced a special therapist also, it makes all the difference with treatment and is imperative. Thanks for commenting. 🙂

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